News & Events

Working to Establish the Rights of Minorities in India

2 January 2007 · Category: Human Rights

As we begin 2007, one of the milestones of the year will be the celebration of the 60th Anniversary of independence for the Republic of India.

In celebration of 'National Day of Minority Rights,' Mohammed. Khalil Ullah met with a group of the top Muslim clerics of India and briefed them on the human rights campaign Scientologists are carrying out in India and around the world.The 2nd most populous country on Earth, India presents a tremendous human rights challenge, with an historically rigid caste system and a lack of opportunity for the members of various religious, ethnic and linguistic groups that live within its borders.

Recognizing the importance of integrating and empowering members of the many different minorities, who number in the hundreds of millions, the government designates one day in December each year as the National Day of Minority Rights.

The Scientologists were guests of honor at an event held by the agency responsible for promotion of the Urdu Language in India, where Mr. Ullah and his team distributed hundreds of human rights booklets to those attending.The dream of human rights in India is not a new one. In fact Jawaharlal Nehru, the first Prime Minister of the country, made it a central issue for the new government, stating:

"The service of India means the service of the millions who suffer. It means the ending of poverty and ignorance and disease and inequality of opportunity. The ambition of the greatest man of our generation has been to wipe every tear from every eye. That may be beyond us, but as long as there are tears and suffering, so long our work will not be over.

"And so we have to labour and to work, and work hard, to give reality to our dreams. Those dreams are for India, but they are also for the world, for all the nations and peoples are too closely knit together today for any one of them to imagine that it can live apart. Peace has been said to be indivisible; so is freedom, so is prosperity now, and so also is disaster in this One World that can no longer be split into isolated fragments."

Mohammed Khalil Ullah, the lead Scientology Volunteer Minister of West Bengal, and his team of Volunteer Ministers (VMs), celebrated Minority Rights Day and the weeks just following it, by promoting the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The Declaration was adopted in 1948 by the United Nations in recognition that "...the inherent dignity and...the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world."

The VMs presented the Urdu version of human rights public service announcements, produced for Youth for Human Rights International by the Church of Scientology International, to the head of the Kolkata Municipal Corporation for Broadcasting, Press, Amusement and Sports.

They attended the National Urdu Language Publisher and Book Sellers Exhibition, whose theme this year was "Humanity." Youth for Human Rights International's booklet in Urdu was particularly appropriate, as it educates youth and adults alike on the Universal Declaration.

They provided copies of this same booklet to the principal of Anjuman Girls' School, known as the best Urdu Language girls' school in Kolkata.

They met with a group of the top Muslim clerics of India and briefed them on what Scientologists are doing to promote human rights in India and around the world.

And they were the guests of honor at an event held by the agency responsible for the promotion of the Urdu Language in India, where Mr. Ullah and his team distributed hundreds of human rights booklets to those attending.

L. Ron Hubbard, founder of the Scientology religion, once said "Human rights must be made a fact, not an idealistic dream," and Scientologists of India have taken this on as their personal mission — to create a better life for the people of their nation.